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  • Valley officers give back through toy drive

    W. Steven Martin knows what it’s like to not have much for Christmas. He came to Arizona in 1958 to be with his sick father, who died just a few months after he arrived.People would come by his house and donate toys and other items for Christmas to Martin and his family. Martin also remembers a police officer who told him that, if he ever had any trouble, the police would be there to help. That sparked a lifelong love for the fire department and law enforcement officers that serve the community.Martin started the drive out of his Chandler garage in 1985, but it evolved to become the WSM 911 Toy Drive in 1988 to honor Tempe Police Officer Robert Lyle Hawk, who was killed by a hit-and-run driver during traffic stop that year. Martin used his job as an on-air radio personality at local station 102.5 KNIX FM to promote his charitable efforts.“I started the toy drive because when I originally moved to Arizona I was extremely poor. A little kid with nothing,” Martin said. “Once I got on the radio I found out I could make a difference in people’s lives.”The toy drive has since grown out of Martin’s garage and now takes up a sizable portion of a Tempe warehouse. Officers from 37 Valley departments visit the warehouse and get to “shop” through the warehouse for toys to donate to up to two families they adopt. After shopping, the officers take the toys they have chosen to the families they have adopted and give the toys to them.“The police and fire(men) that come through, they are an example of how you find people in need. It’s not just a signup list it’s a direct need,” Martin said. “We improve law enforcement’s value to the public by them seeing a policeman or a fireman in their home on their hands and knees saying ‘Merry Christmas and things will be better.’”

  • Auditions open for Chandler senior variety show

    Chandler is inviting its senior residents to audition for its March senior variety show.The 22nd Annual “Spice of Life” Senior Variety Show will feature singing, dancing and other talented adults 50 years of age and up.Auditions are Jan. 6 and Jan. 12 at Chandler Senior Center (202 E. Boston St.). Further information can be found by calling Eliza Haws at (480) 782-2741.

  • Chandler Police release pair of sex offender notifications

    The Chandler Police Department has sent out notifications for two sex offenders who have moved to the city.The first, 64-year-old David Smith, moved to a residence at the 1600 block of West Stottler Drive. Smith was convicted in 1983 of sexual conduct with a minor in Maricopa County and served 10 years in prison; the victim was a 9-year-old female family member. He was also convicted of two counts of indecent exposure in 2012 and received a five-year probation.The second, Reggie Rich, is homeless but lives near Arizona Avenue and Willis Road. Rich was convicted of sexual conduct with a minor in 2000; the victim was a 15-year-old girl. Rich served three months in jail and received an eight-year probation.Smith and Rich are classified as level 2, or intermediate, risks.

  • Gilbert group raising funds for microfinance project in Africa

    Charity isn’t just about the sweeping gestures, the $10,000 checks donated to a good cause via a well-regarded philanthropist. Charity encompasses smaller donations, those $5, $10, $20 gifts that tend to add up to large amounts quickly. Charity isn’t about an unreciprocated donation either; a small loan can provide an enormous boost to a fledgling businesses.That’s the gist of what microfinancing is, and it outlines what Oasis Microfinance International is working to do for people in poverty in sub-Saharan Africa.The Gilbert-based, nonprofit charity Oasis Microfinance International is working to support the creation of what founder Frackson Sakala said is akin to a bank for the poor using a revolving fund — a pool of money that refills itself when people repay the loans they take out. That, in essence, would ensure the money doesn’t dry out and allows the organization to provide funding to a multitude of people — aspiring businesswomen are a focal point for the organization — who might not qualify for a larger loan.“That’s our goal, to make sure the poor are able to access funds even without collateral,” Sakala said.The model is pretty safe for both the investors and the people borrowing the funds due to the minimal investment made on both ends; the lender isn’t contributing that much funding, while the recipient, who works with four or five people to take out the loan, doesn’t have a sizable dollar amount hanging over his or her head.Sakala said the other benefit is the assistance Oasis Microfinance International will provide to people who receive a loan. Along with the funding is a one-week training session offering lessons on business planning and bookkeeping, along with technical support.

  • Chandler resident decorates for children, Hanukkah

    Wesley Hoekstra always likes to decorate for the holidays. His wife Alice will tell you that.But this year, after moving to Chandler from Chicago six months ago, they did something a little extra.“My husband was always out putting up decorations for the holidays,” Alice said. “He included veterans, family members, anybody you could think of.”But, while he always decorated for Christmas, the one holiday he didn’t necessarily decorate for was Hanukkah.That was until he overheard 6-year-old Aaron Goard, who lives down the street, talking to his mother.Hoekstra said he heard Goard tell his mother: “Mom, do they celebrate Hanukkah?”

  • WalletHub ranks Tempe as best major city for singles

    PHOENIX -- If you're single in Arizona, the best major city to live appears to be Tempe.And Peoria is the worst.That's the conclusion of WalletHub after looking at the things that make a community attractive to those without partners -- and perhaps looking for one.The new report looks at two sets of factors.One is strictly economics: What is the cost of romancing someone. That's measured by things like the price of a typical meal, the cost of a six-pack of Heinekens and taxi fare.Also factored in are the things to make someone date-worthy like the bill for the beauty salon and how much it costs to belong to a fitness club.

  • Tackle 2015 goals with outdoorsy local fitness options

    HikingUsery Mountain Regional Park offers Progressive Fitness Hikes through the desert on the outskirts of Mesa and Apache Junction. Beginning Jan. 17, the series will feature a new hike every Saturday through Feb. 21. Each trek increases in length and difficulty in order to prepare for the grand finale hike — a 7.5-mile loop around Pass Mountain.The first hike is approximately 2.5 miles on fairly level terrain, but trails in the series will involve elevation changes, uneven terrain and a moderate pace. Hikers are expected to stay with the group. Participation in the fourth or fifth hike is required to join the Pass Mountain hike.The park also offers Three Mile Thursday hikes with other fitness-minded hikers (the next is Jan. 8) and a session called Beginning Desert Hiking (Dec. 26 and Jan. 19) for newbies who prefer to tackle trails in solitude. In the latter, park hosts will cover what to carry, what to wear and how to hike safely in the desert on an easy, 1-mile, scenic hike.Entry to Usery Mountain Regional Park is $6 per vehicle; annual passes are available. The park is at 3939 N. Usery Pass Road in Mesa. For information or a schedule of events, call (480) 984-0032 or visit Maricopa.gov/parks/usery.San Tan Mountain Regional Park in Queen Creek also hosts a fitness-focused hiking series. Upcoming “Trail Blazers” hikes are scheduled for Dec. 26 and Jan. 9. Both will take hikers 700 feet up to the Goldmine Mountain Summit, a 3-mile trip. San Tan Mountain Regional Park is at 6533 W. Phillips Road. For information, call (480) 655-5554 or visit Maricopa.gov/parks/santan.

  • The Constant Traveler: Explore the past with a tour of Flagstaff’s Riordan Mansion

    Most Westerners know the Craftsman or Arts and Crafts style homes from visiting places in California such as Pasadena, but not many people know one of the most unique homes of this design can be found much closer to home, in Flagstaff. Called the Riordan Mansion, it’s one of the unusual gems in the Arizona State Park system.I first heard of the Riordan Mansion while touring Marston House in San Diego. The guide to this historic Craftsman property in Balboa Park, said something to the effect that the largest Arts and Crafts style home in the country was located in Flagstaff. That caught my attention and I resolved the next time I went to Flagstaff I would make the visit.Either I heard the San Diego guide wrong or he misspoke, as the Riordan Mansion is actually the largest Arts and Crafts “duplex” in the world. The word “duplex” is important because the home was built for two pioneer families. Timothy and Michael Riordan, who in 1897 bought the Arizona Lumber Company mill from their brother, married two sisters, Caroline and Elizabeth Metz, and they had the house built for the two families with a common area in between  The Arts and Crafts movement, which emerged at the end of 1800s, flourished in the United States and Great Britain, the world’s two great economic powerhouses, as an anti-industrial design philosophy. The movement promoted simplicity of form, natural materials and handicraft. In architecture, the design form can best be seen in what has come to be known as the Craftsman bungalow, a modest home for the middle class.The Riordan Mansion conforms to the movement’s concepts with its log-slab siding, local volcanic stone arches and hand-split wooden shingles. It is, however, anything but simple in its design. The home totals 13,000 square feet, with about 6,000 square feet allotted to both families and 1,000 square feet of common area in between that essentially became the recreation room, often used for entertainment.It was built over two years, finally being completed in 1904. And despite its location in the tiny logging community of Flagstaff, the house boasted all the modern conveniences of the day, including electricity. The visitor center at the front of the property was once a six-car garage.

  • Vanessa Williams wraps up tour in Valley

    The actress and pop music diva known for songs “Save the Best for Last,” “Dreamin’ ” and “Colors of the Wind” performs. Williams will take the stage at  7:30 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 18 at the Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts, 7380 E. Second St., Scottsdale. Tickets start at $59 and information is available at ScottsdalePerformingArts.org or by calling (480) 499-8587.

  • Quick look: New this week at the movies

    >> This information is provided in community partnership with Harkins Theatres. For showtimes, theater locations and tickets, go to HarkinsTheatres.com.New this weekAntarctica: A Year on IceA visually stunning journey to the end of the world with the hardy and devoted people who live there year-round. The research stations scattered throughout the continent host a close-knit international population of scientists, technicians and craftsmen. Isolated from the rest of the world, enduring months of unending darkness followed by periods when the sun never sets, Antarctic residents experience firsthand the beauty and brutality of the most severe environment on Earth.  Documentary.  PGBig Eyes“Big Eyes” tells the outrageous true story of one of the most epic art frauds in history. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, painter Walter Keane had reached success beyond belief, revolutionizing the commercialization of popular art with his enigmatic paintings of waifs with big eyes. The bizarre and shocking truth would eventually be discovered though: Walter’s works were actually not created by him at all, but by his wife Margaret. The Keanes, it seemed, had been living a colossal lie that had fooled the entire world. A tale too incredible to be fiction, “Big Eyes” centers on Margaret’s awakening as an artist, the phenomenal success of her paintings, and her tumultuous relationship with her husband, who was catapulted to international fame while taking credit for her work.  Starring: Amy Adams, Krysten Ritter, Christoph Waltz, Jason Schwartzman, Terence Stamp, Danny Huston.  PG-13

  • Rock out with Roger Clyne & The Peacemakers

    Arizona’s own beloved desert rock band plays songs from its new album and favorites at two 21-and-older shows. The shows are at 8 p.m. Friday, Dec. 26, and Saturday, Dec. 27 at Talking Stick Resort, 9800 E. Indian Bend Road, Scottsdale. Tickets are $45 and can be purchased by calling (480) 850-7734 or going online at TalkingStickResort.com.

  • ‘Unbroken’ strikes a nerve in Japan over WWII past

    Angelina Jolie’s new movie “Unbroken” has not been released in Japan yet, but it has already struck a nerve in a country still wrestling over its wartime past.The buzz on social networks and in online chatter is decidedly negative over the film, which depicts a U.S. Olympic runner who endures torture at a Japanese prisoner-of-war camp during World War II.Some people are calling for a boycott of the movie, although there is no release date in Japan yet. It hits theaters in the U.S. on Christmas Day.Others want the ban extended to Jolie, the director — unusual in a nation enamored with Hollywood, and especially Jolie and her husband Brad Pitt, who have reputations as Japan lovers.The movie follows the real-life story of Louis Zamperini as told in a 2010 book by Laura Hillenbrand. The book has not been translated into Japanese, but online trailers have provoked outrage. Zamperini, played by Jack O’Connell, survived in a raft for 47 days with two other crewmen after their B-24 bomber crashed into the Pacific Ocean, only to be captured by the Japanese and sent to a prisoner-of-war camp.Especially provocative is a passage in the book that accuses the Japanese of engaging in cannibalism of POWs. It is not clear how much of that will be in the movie, but in Japan that is too much for some.

  • One-on-one with Basha wrestling coach Mike Garcia

    Basha’s wrestling team is off to a very solid start. After finishing eighth in last year’s state tournament the Bears are looking to improve on that finish this year.Basha recently walked away from the Coyote Open at Skyline High School last weekend with a big win, as well as having three kids individually take first place.The East Valley Tribune caught up with Bears’ wrestling coach Mike Garcia to talk about the Coyote Open, some of his wrestlers and the differences between this year’s team and last year’s.Q: Coach, just tell me a little about how you guys did at the Coyote Open; you took first, so something went right.A: We had a great weekend over at the Coyote Open Saturday. We ended up winning the tournament by about 30 points. The kids wrestled really well. We’d had an off week, we didn’t have any matches that week other than the tournament, so the kids were ready to go, basically. We had a long week of practice. We had really good practices — covered a lot of technique. And the kids, we’re real proud of our kids right now. They’re a real good group. We don’t have many seniors, we don’t have many seniors, so our kids are sophomores, juniors, very coachable kids that when they get the kids they like to get out there and show you what they can do so we’re really proud of them.Q: You had three kids take first place, how much confidence does that give your team?

  • Photos: Moon Valley Wrestling Tournament

  • Seton football coach Bowser reflects on 40-year career

    Rex Bowser sits down at a small table in the corner of a Starbucks in Chandler. The longtime Seton Catholic football coach sips his coffee in a laid-back, relaxed manner and begins to tell the story of his more than four-decade-long career.At first, Bowser wanted to be a basketball coach — football was a secondary option. He said he only received a single job offer after graduating college in 1972 and, along with being a basketball coach, part of the job included coaching eighth-grade football.Two years later, he left the hardwood for the gridiron.“The football, I don’t know, it just struck a cord or something,” Bowser said. “And I just went from there.”For 33 years Bowser coached and taught in Indiana and he had decided, at least for the first time, he was ready to retire. His eldest son had graduated from Purdue and taken a job with Intel in Arizona. Then his youngest son moved to Arizona and Bowser soon became a grandfather.He had a decision to make.

  • Hamilton trying to get back to title game, but will have plenty of challenges on the way

    When it comes to boys soccer, the East Valley is loaded in Division I, while Division II and III look to catch up and represent the Valley in the playoffs.Last year, eight East Valley high schools qualified for the Division I playoffs while only two teams from the East Valley qualified for the division II or III tournament. Here’s a look at how the divisions shake out.Division IAt the highest division, Hamilton appears to be the team to beat once again. After snagging the No. 1 seed in last year’s playoffs, the Huskies made a run all the way to the state title game before falling to Brophy 1-0.Although coach Nick Markette says his team isn’t necessarily playing with a chip on its shoulder, the players are using last year’s championship defeat as motivation.“It provides fuel. It provides a sense of urgency,” he said. “In our vision we should have won it and our vision we play every year to win it so it certainly provides a level of cognitive dissonance if you will to put in that sense of urgency to continue to work and progress.”

  • Highland probation gives end of season a strange feel

    Highland High School’s boys golf team was placed on a one-year probation by the Arizona Interscholastic Association (AIA) for violating a regulation that disallows players from playing on the state championship venue course after a certain dateHighland boys sophomore golfer Brock Goyen played on the Aguila Golf Course in Laveen, the site of the state boys golf championship, after he was no longer allowed to play the course prior to the state tournament.Goyen won the boys Division I state championship at last month’s tournament. But now he has been stripped of his title and the program has been placed on probation after an appeal by the school.According to AIA bylaw 24.9.3.1 states, “A practice (including walking of the course) or competition on the site of the state tournament, is not permitted beginning with the day after the posted last state qualifying date.”That date was Oct. 25 and, after learning that Goyen had played the course after Oct. 25, he was disqualified from the tournament. The title was given to Hamilton’s Jino Sohn, who finished two shots behind Goyen.Goyen initially won the individual boys state title by shooting an eight-under 136 over the two-day event Nov. 5-6.

  • Seton Catholic football coach Rex Bowser stepping down

    Seton Catholic football head coach Rex Bowser has stepped away from his duties head coach after seven seasons.Bowser confirmed on Thursday he has retired from his position as head coach and will leave his post as a physical education teacher at Seton Catholic following this school year."It's just time," Bowser said, calling his job as head coach, "the best I ever had." Seton went 12-1 this year and ended the regular season undefeated before losing to Snowflake 33-20 in the state semifinals. Seton Catholic had a 62-24 overall record during Bowser's seven seasons and went 48-5 in the last four years, winning the state title in 2012.

Tech Data Doctors Deals

  • Gas prices take big dive for the holidays

    Drivers heading across Arizona for the holidays didn’t have to pay as much at the pump as they did the week prior.AAA Arizona reports the state’s average fuel price is down by 17.5 cents to $2.270 a gallon. Flagstaff maintains its position as the most expensive with $2.632, while the East Valley has the lowest average at $2.104. Some stations in Tempe have average fuel prices below $2 a gallon.The national average has declined by more than 15 cents to $2.353.

  • Tick-tock: Tips for last-minute shoppers

    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The clock is ticking, and your holiday shopping list isn't complete. Don't fret — you aren't alone. The National Retail Federation found that only about half of shoppers had finished shopping as of Dec. 10. That means tens of millions will be ticking those final items off their lists in the coming days. But procrastination doesn't have to mean desperation. Here are a few tips to help survive last-minute shopping: —SEIZE THE DAY: Retailers know the rush is coming, and they are doing everything they can to attract last-minute shoppers. This includes extended shopping hours, expedited shipping and exclusive promotions. That opens up lots of strategies for shopping that will keep you out of the crazy lines in stores at noon on Christmas Eve. One tactic is to become a night owl. Many retailers are open longer in the week before Christmas. For example, Wal-Mart says its stores are open 24 hours a day up until 8 p.m. on Christmas Eve and it is offering shipping options up until Dec. 23. Toys R Us stores are open around the clock from the morning of Dec. 23 through 9 p.m. Christmas Eve; it also is extending its hours in the days preceding. And many retailers, such as Best Buy, allow shoppers to find an item online and pick it up at a store. Even 7-Eleven is targeting shoppers, offering gift cards, toys and stocking stuffers in its stores. The bottom line: Take advantage of those last-minute discounts and other deals. — DO YOUR HOMEWORK: Marshal Cohen, chief industry analyst at market researcher NPD Group, says many people do not yet know what they want to give, or get. "These consumers are the ones who put themselves in a stressful situation," he said. "The one saving grace is online (shopping) is a chance for a lot of people to do their homework." He said shoppers can narrow down their options ahead of time by looking online. You can also check Amazon.com to see if the person has a wish list you didn't know about, or study Facebook or Pinterest pages for ideas. Such prep work can save a lot of headaches and potentially limit last-minute impulse purchases that can prove costly. — WEAR COMFORTABLE SHOES: Seriously, this is a common-sense step many shoppers skip. "Wear comfortable shoes for goodness sake," Cohen said. "It (shopping) is exercise and it's not very comfortable." Don't waste time cruising to find the closest spot to the store either, he said. Those comfortable shoes will make it easier to just park and walk.

  • Let Joe Know: Read the fine print before booking your next airline flight

    Are you traveling over the next couple of weeks?If so, have you thought about what happens if the airline overbooks or your flight is canceled?Linda Tableman learned firsthand.“It was raining really hard when we got to the airport and they told us the flight would be delayed,” Tableman said.She said the flight was delayed two and a half hours, and that forced her to miss a connecting flight back to Phoenix. And she says the only flight offered by the airline to get home, was three days later!“That’s a lot to ask for a person, people work, have lives, family,” Tableman said.

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  • The Constant Traveler: Explore the past with a tour of Flagstaff’s Riordan Mansion

    Most Westerners know the Craftsman or Arts and Crafts style homes from visiting places in California such as Pasadena, but not many people know one of the most unique homes of this design can be found much closer to home, in Flagstaff. Called the Riordan Mansion, it’s one of the unusual gems in the Arizona State Park system.I first heard of the Riordan Mansion while touring Marston House in San Diego. The guide to this historic Craftsman property in Balboa Park, said something to the effect that the largest Arts and Crafts style home in the country was located in Flagstaff. That caught my attention and I resolved the next time I went to Flagstaff I would make the visit.Either I heard the San Diego guide wrong or he misspoke, as the Riordan Mansion is actually the largest Arts and Crafts “duplex” in the world. The word “duplex” is important because the home was built for two pioneer families. Timothy and Michael Riordan, who in 1897 bought the Arizona Lumber Company mill from their brother, married two sisters, Caroline and Elizabeth Metz, and they had the house built for the two families with a common area in between  The Arts and Crafts movement, which emerged at the end of 1800s, flourished in the United States and Great Britain, the world’s two great economic powerhouses, as an anti-industrial design philosophy. The movement promoted simplicity of form, natural materials and handicraft. In architecture, the design form can best be seen in what has come to be known as the Craftsman bungalow, a modest home for the middle class.The Riordan Mansion conforms to the movement’s concepts with its log-slab siding, local volcanic stone arches and hand-split wooden shingles. It is, however, anything but simple in its design. The home totals 13,000 square feet, with about 6,000 square feet allotted to both families and 1,000 square feet of common area in between that essentially became the recreation room, often used for entertainment.It was built over two years, finally being completed in 1904. And despite its location in the tiny logging community of Flagstaff, the house boasted all the modern conveniences of the day, including electricity. The visitor center at the front of the property was once a six-car garage.

  • Keeping the Faith: Oh, the tangled web we weave

    Here I am, twisted up in the same desperate situation again this year. It’s not my fault – I swear it’s not. Anticipating this jumbled mess, and having been stuck in it many times before, I planned carefully to avoid it. A year ago I employed a deliberate strategy to prevent this very disaster, and I put in painstaking efforts to manage my risk. But now I see that my preemptive planning was an obvious failure. Forces beyond my control have conspired against me to deceive and weave a tangled web. My dilemma? The annual hanging of the Christmas lights.When I put these lights away in the attic last January they were in perfect arranged order. I had rolled and packed them so carefully, I just knew the strings of blinking colors would burst from their boxes unfettered. Instead, every strand – every single strand I tell you – looks like a giant bird’s nest.How did this happen? Do the electrical cords naturally convulse like this? Is this how Santa’s elves keep themselves busy in the summer months – sneaking into our attics, basements, and storage units to twist and kink our well-organized Christmas decorations? “Bah, humbug” to it all, I say.I doubt that Joseph had any holiday lights to string up on the first Christmas, but he had to feel like a big tangled mess had just landed in his lap. One day everything made sense. The next day nothing did. One moment he had a well-conceived plan. The next moment he had a mess on his hands. In January his life was in order, boxed nicely for the future. In December, that same life had devolved into chaos.One day Joseph was driving nails, building furniture, and doing what carpenters do, and the next he was in the middle of a divine conspiracy. One day he was single, planning a wedding to the fair and beautiful Mary, and the next he was married, preparing to rear a child that was definitely not his. One day Joseph was at home in Nazareth in blissful, warm familiarity, and the next he was fighting off the midnight cold in a strange Bethlehem stable as a new child was born into the world. Forces beyond his control were definitely at work.What did Joseph do with this tangled web? He went to work untangling every twisted strand of it. He took on the responsibility that had found him. Buoyed by his faith, he believed this child birthed by Mary was the miraculous, chosen One of God – the Messiah. Joseph chose to play the role of father to a child that was not his. He bore the scandalous stares and the hushed small-town gossip about his wife and his adopted son. He kept driving nails, kept building furniture, and kept doing what carpenters do, unraveling each stubborn strand as he went.

  • Gilbert group raising funds for microfinance project in Africa

    Charity isn’t just about the sweeping gestures, the $10,000 checks donated to a good cause via a well-regarded philanthropist. Charity encompasses smaller donations, those $5, $10, $20 gifts that tend to add up to large amounts quickly. Charity isn’t about an unreciprocated donation either; a small loan can provide an enormous boost to a fledgling businesses.That’s the gist of what microfinancing is, and it outlines what Oasis Microfinance International is working to do for people in poverty in sub-Saharan Africa.The Gilbert-based, nonprofit charity Oasis Microfinance International is working to support the creation of what founder Frackson Sakala said is akin to a bank for the poor using a revolving fund — a pool of money that refills itself when people repay the loans they take out. That, in essence, would ensure the money doesn’t dry out and allows the organization to provide funding to a multitude of people — aspiring businesswomen are a focal point for the organization — who might not qualify for a larger loan.“That’s our goal, to make sure the poor are able to access funds even without collateral,” Sakala said.The model is pretty safe for both the investors and the people borrowing the funds due to the minimal investment made on both ends; the lender isn’t contributing that much funding, while the recipient, who works with four or five people to take out the loan, doesn’t have a sizable dollar amount hanging over his or her head.Sakala said the other benefit is the assistance Oasis Microfinance International will provide to people who receive a loan. Along with the funding is a one-week training session offering lessons on business planning and bookkeeping, along with technical support.

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