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  • Chandler mom receives ASU scholarship to complete degree

    Chandler resident Allison Desrosiers doesn’t like the term “single mother.” She doesn’t agree with the stereotypes that come along with it or the images that tend to come to mind with the term.“I think that they imagine somebody in the welfare line. They picture somebody in the trailer park. That’s one of the inaccuracies that makes me really uncomfortable with that phrase,” she said.Desrosiers is far from being in either of those scenarios. She is a single mom, but she’s working to better life for her and her 13-year-old son.Recently, having hit the lifetime maximum for federal student aid, Desrosiers was one of four students awarded the ASU Online Finish Line Scholarship. The $2,500 scholarship is awarded to students who have hit or are within $5,000 of reaching the lifetime maximum of federal student aid.During the day, she works at an integrated medical practice that specializes in chiropractic care, nutrition and pain management, and on the nights and weekends, she works as an attendant for a young girl with cerebral palsy. Money isn’t tight for Desrosiers, again one of the stereotypes she feels is automatically associated with single moms, but a careful financial eye is required.“We’re very careful in the way we budget ourselves,” she said. “There’s no smartphones in our house. We don’t subscribe to any television services or anything like that. We’re very down to earth.”

  • Fundraiser organizer says Corona Del Sol in Tempe is truly helping one of their own

    The community of Corona Del Sol High School is stepping up to help with a beloved classmate's fight with leukemia and his family's mounting medical bills.Student council members, the volleyball team, members of the Make-a-Wish club and more all gathered Saturday morning to put on a fundraising car wash to help pay for Ridge Vanderbur's medical expenses."People sometimes think kids are so self-centered, but you see here a great group of kids," the fundraiser organizer said, pointing out the huge turnout from the young community.Since Ridge has aspirations of becoming a firefighter someday, Chandler Fire Department showed up to the event. They not only washed cars, but donated hundreds of dollars to the cause as well."Chandler Firefighter Charities and Chandler Firefighter Health and Medical wanted to help out and show support for someone that might be a brother in the future," said Chandler Fire Chief Jeff West.The car wash was held until 1 p.m. Saturday near Rural Road between Warner and Ray roads in Tempe.

  • Chandler mayor urges for community to support domestic violence victims

    While Chandler has received recognition as one of the safest municipalities of its size in the country, officials admit it can do more about the fight against domestic violence.That’s why Mayor Jay Tibshraeny told an audience at a recent domestic violence event the city is working to keep the statistics low in their city and while bringing them down even further.“A life without violence is not only possible but is within reach,” he said.Tibshraeny spoke during the sixth annual “Speak, Share, Survive” event coordinated by the city’s Domestic Violence Commission on Sept. 18. The nature of the event was to emphasize the risks of domestic violence while supporting victims.Domestic violence is defined as any form of intimidation, physical assault, battery, sexual assault, and other abusive behavior used to assert power over another individual in an intimate relationship. According to a report from The National Domestic Violence Hotline, out of 1,985 calls, the most common type of domestic violence was emotional and verbal abuse, which made up 69 percent of experiences in Arizona in the first half of the year 2013. The report also stated that 74 percent of victims experienced physical abuse and 6 percent of calls were for sexual abuse, with some victims experiencing more than one form of violence at the time of their call.Tibshreany said Chandler Police Department and employees in other safety programs protected more than 700 survivors in the past year. But the city also saw two victims of domestic die at the hands of their assailants last year,.

  • Police arrest man in connection with Tempe sex abuse case

    Authorities say a 22-year-old man is behind bars after admitting to sexually abusing a woman at her apartment in Tempe.The incident happened around 4:30 a.m. March, 27 near Mill Avenue and 5th Street.Tempe Police Lieutenant Michael Pooley said the victim was sleeping in her bedroom when she was awakened by a man touching her genital area.The woman confronted the suspect and chased him out of the apartment.On Friday, Nathan Whipple was taken into custody Friday after a woman called police to report him walking around in her backyard.Pooley said officers recognized Whipple from a composite sketch released from the March sexual abuse case. Police said when they questioned Whipple, he admitted to the crime.

  • Follow-up work requested in probe of dog deaths

    Prosecutors are asking the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office for follow-up work in the investigation into the deaths of more than 20 dogs at a Gilbert kennel.The Maricopa County Attorney's Office says Monday that the extra work was needed before it can decide whether to bring charges against the owners of the Green Acres Boarding Kennel and two caretakers.The sheriff's office had recommended that felony charges be filed.The kennel owners say the animals died of heat exhaustion in June when one dog chewed through the air conditioner's power cord after two caregivers had left the facility.Investigators say no evidence was found that a chewed-up electrical wire had cut power to a cooling unit.A veterinarian says the dogs likely suffocated to death.

  • Tempe football coach suspended for praying

    A Tempe school football coach must miss his team's game Friday as part of a punishment for praying with his players.Tom Brittain is serving the second week of a two-game suspension from his job as coach at Tempe Preparatory Academy.Headmaster David Baum says Brittain instructed a player to lead the team in prayer after they won a game.Baum says staff cannot appear to condone religion to students on behalf of the state-funded charter school's behalf.Some students hung a sign in support of Brittain at the school's homecoming game last week.Some parents have expressed outrage at Baum's decision. But others say the school is not a religious institution and that Brittain violated school policy.

  • Neeson shines in 'Walk Among the Tombstones'

    Painted along the edges of “A Walk Among the Tombstones” is the urgent reminder the end of the world is nigh. That was life in 1999 in the months leading toward the current millennium – a period loaded with paranoia about how humanity will end because of the Y2K virus once Dec. 31, 1999 became Jan. 1, 2000.Amid the panic and newspapers headlines heralding the dawning of dread and destruction portrayed in the film is a moment when one character reads one of the hyperbolic headlines and mutters, “People are afraid of all the wrong things.” What makes that line so intentionally effective is how it reveals “A Walk Among the Tombstones’” true intentions. It's not the big catastrophes that are worthy of fear; rather, it's the people flittering about your periphery who should invoke your terror, as you can never know what they can do to you. Or, more importantly, what they can force you to do.It's worth emphasizing “A Walk Among the Tombstones” is not a Liam Neeson revenge flick, despite an opening sequence that has the human embodiment of lurching despair paired with two shots, a gun, and three armed robbers to shoot. All that action occurs in a flashback eight years prior to the events of 1999, when Neeson's Matt Scudder, now a private detective and recovering alcoholic, is asked by a drug dealer (Dan Stevens) to investigate the kidnapping and murder of his wife.Neeson discovers the brutal death was the most recent in a spree in which the killers hold the wife of a drug dealer hostage, collect a ransom and then kill her anyway. It's a dark world Neeson has stumbled into, and all he has to help him are his wits, a homeless teenage assistant who references fictional private eyes (Brian Bailey), and a pressing desire to do the right thing. The lattermost attribute pushes Neeson toward a confrontation with the two killers (David Harbour and Adam David Thompson), an encounter he may not come back from alive.It still may sound like a film befitting Neeson's recent ouevre like “Non-Stop,” but the brooding Irishman is not hyper-violent mode like he is in those (effectively) trashy Luc Besson films. The opening blood splatter in “A Walk Among the Tombstones” instead motivates Neeson to drop the gun and replace it with cunning and conversation – in one scene he defuses a potentially violent confrontation with a threat backed by a haunting glower and his patented gruff. That's all a good shamus like Neeson needs to solve a case no matter how convoluted it is and no matter how many punches he receives for his efforts.That's the primary enjoyment from “A Walk Among the Tombstones,” as watching the weathered Neeson (does any A-lister look as rundown as he does?) attempt to unravel a peculiar and horrifying case is captivating and engaging. His Scudder is not on the same par as other fictional detectives like Sam Spade and Philip Marlowe (they get name dropped by Bailey alongside Daunte Culpepper of all people), but he's a good facsimile and more befitting a world of brutality than the sloppily suave characters played by Humphrey Bogart.

  • Downtown Mesa introduces monthly festival

    A new event is coming Sept. 19 to downtown Mesa in the form of Flash Park Friday, with the businesses lining Main Street offering “parks” on the sidewalk next to their storefront that are related to a monthly theme — the first being splash parks. Attendees of all ages will enjoy cooling off on a large water slide and playing in a pop-up splash park free of charge. Other activities ranging from a scavenger hunt to fishing for concert tickets and free giveaways add to the festivities. The event is also pet-friendly, so don’t hesitate to bring Fido along for the fun.Vendors and live musicians will also be on hand to feed and entertain the crowd. Alcoholic beverages will be available for purchase. For more information, visit DowntownMesa.com.If you goWhat: Flash Park FridayWhen: 6-10 p.m. Friday, Sept. 19

  • Alice Cooper lets young musicians prove themselves

    Rock musician Alice Cooper’s annual youth music competition showcases his passion for furthering education by giving young musicians a shot on stage.Alice Cooper’s Proof is in the Pudding talent search, now in its 10th year, brings together musicians younger than 25 years old from every music genre to compete for an opportunity to perform on stage with Cooper. One soloist and one band are chosen every year to perform with Cooper and other rock musicians, such as KISS and The Tubes, during Cooper’s annual Christmas Pudding charity concert.“It gives them the opportunity to play in usually the biggest crowd they’ve ever played, with musicians that have been heroes of them forever,” said Jeff Moore, executive director of Solid Rock.Solid Rock, a nonprofit organization founded by Cooper and Chuck Savale in 1995, puts on the annual competition. The foundation works to help teens in the surrounding community through education, music and dance.A community center for teens, called The Rock at 32nd Street, was built by Solid Rock in 2012 to provide a learning space for the arts that might not be offered in some schools. The center offers a space for bands to rehearse, free dance classes and a “safe space” to spend time, Moore said.“It was really meant to meet a need that wasn’t being met at the time: teenagers,” Moore said. “Teenagers don’t want to be next to a kid drinking milk and coloring in a coloring book.”

  • Quick look: New this week at the movies

    >> This information is provided in community partnership with Harkins Theatres. For showtimes, theater locations and tickets, go to HarkinsTheatres.com.A Walk Among the TombstonesFormerly a detective with the NYPD, now a recovering alcoholic haunted by regrets, Matt Scudder has a lot to make up for. When a series of kidnappings targeting the city’s worst drug criminals escalates to grisly murder, the circuit’s ruthless leader convinces Scudder to find the culprits and bring them to bloody justice. Working as an unlicensed private detective, Matt sees what the police don’t see and treads where they most fear to. Operating just outside the law to track down the monsters responsible, Scudder stops just short of becoming one himself. Starring: Liam Neeson, Dan Stevens, David Harbour, Sebastian Roché, Mark Consuelos, Boyd Holbrook, Whitney Able, Ruth Wilson, Maurice Compte. RGod Help the GirlEve is a catastrophe — low on self-esteem but high on fantasy, especially when it comes to music. Over the course of one Glasgow summer, she meets two similarly rootless souls: posh Cass and fastidious James, and together they form a pop group. This film is a poignant coming-of-age story that doubles as a sublime indie-pop musical from Stuart Murdoch leader of the band Belle and Sebastian and one of indie pop’s biggest songwriters. Starring: Emily Browning, Hannah Murray, Pierre Boulanger, Olly Alexander. Not RatedLast Weekend

  • Football Friday Night Out

    There’ll be no such thing as a boring game this week on the high school football circuit, and you’ll need plenty of good eats to keep up with the action. Here are five options to find a tasty bite. Go team!Liberty (Nev.) at HamiltonHamilton faces a foe from outside the state borders this week as it faces a Liberty squad that is one of the best in Nevada. Hamilton’s 6-foot-7 quarterback James Sosinski will look to get the ball to dynamic playmakers like running backs Kyeler Burke and Ari Johnson. One thing though — Liberty is big. Four of the Patriots’ players tip the scales at 300 pounds or more. WHISKEY ROSE SALOON(480) 895-7673 or WhiskeyRoseChandler.com135 W. Ocotillo Road, Chandler, (.2 mile from Hamilton HS)Pregame: One of the few places to go where you can actually see the field from the restaurant, Whiskey Rose sits across the street from the field at Hamilton and from the right angle, you can see the scoreboard, so you know just how much time you have to finish your food or your drinks before kickoff.

  • On the rim with Jethro Tull’s Ian Anderson

    Legendary progressive pioneers Jethro Tull featuring Ian Anderson hits The Ikeda Theater at Mesa Arts Center on Saturday, Sept. 20, to perform the best of Jethro Tull and songs off Anderson’s latest album “Homo Erraticus.”Anderson, the seminal frontman for Jethro Tull, has performed in more than 54 countries over a 45-year period, and is widely considered an icon of the progressive rock genre and protagonist of the flute in rock music. With more than 60 million albums sold in its career, Tull has been characterized by Anderson’s trademark acoustic textures created with ethnic flutes and whistles and the mandolin family of instruments.While on tour in Scotland, Anderson spoke exclusively to GetOut to promote his upcoming show, his new double album and why he doesn’t consider himself an artist.Q: You were born in Scotland and raised in England. Your father was from Scotland and your mother is from England. How has that shaped your personal and artistic sensibilities?IA: I think it gives me a sense of the length and breadth of our small country and a rich understanding of our people and culture, because the Brits are a mongrel breed much like the Americans. Being a small island off the northwest coast of Europe, we are insular in some ways and the product of travelers who settled in Britain at the end of the last Ice Age to the Roman invasion after the birth of Christ … and of course, the huge cultural invasion of the USA, particularly in the post-war years. We are rich in a variety of culture, history and ways, which I think gives me a certain perspective when I am writing lyrics.Q: You’ve never catered to public tastes but rather have always made your art very personal.

  • Tempe football coach suspended for praying

    A Tempe school football coach must miss his team's game Friday as part of a punishment for praying with his players.Tom Brittain is serving the second week of a two-game suspension from his job as coach at Tempe Preparatory Academy.Headmaster David Baum says Brittain instructed a player to lead the team in prayer after they won a game.Baum says staff cannot appear to condone religion to students on behalf of the state-funded charter school's behalf.Some students hung a sign in support of Brittain at the school's homecoming game last week.Some parents have expressed outrage at Baum's decision. But others say the school is not a religious institution and that Brittain violated school policy.

  • Tempe Corona wrestling coach to be inducted into national hall of fame

    Thirty years after winning an Olympic medal, Corona del Sol High School wrestling coach Jim Martinez will be recognized as one of the champions of his sport.Martinez will be inducted into the Alan and Gloria Rice Greco-Roman Hall of Champions — part of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame — on Oct. 18 due to his decades of success as a Greco-Roman wrestler.“I’m truly astonished that people, especially those in the wrestling community who review the depth and breadth of my career, would put me in that category,” he said.According to the Sun Press & News (Minn.), Martinez was a high school champion from Osseo, Minn., and became a two-time All-American wrestler and Big 10 champion while attending the University of Minnesota. He earned a spot on the U.S. Olympic team for the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles and defeated Romanian Stefan Negrisan for the lightweight Greco-Roman wrestling bronze medal.Martinez, who is one of eight children, attributes his drive to succeed from the encouragement he received from his mother.“She was one of the toughest coaches I ever had. It’s interesting that I’m the one who had the successes I had, but was the one who needed the biggest push,” he said.

  • QB Sosinski growing into role as Huskies’ leader

    People tend to look up to Hamilton senior quarterback James Sosinski, literally. At 6-foot-7, Sosinski is a towering presence on the football field. However, while his physical stature has always been evident, his vocal presence as a leader hasn’t always been the same.You most likely won’t hear Sosinski barking orders or yelling hardly at all. Coach Steve Belles compared him more to Arizona Cardinals quarterback Carson Palmer, a calming and quiet presence, than to the New Orleans Saints’ Drew Brees or the San Diego Chargers’ Philip Rivers, both known for being loud and forward in the leadership styles.Sosinski will tell you that being outspoken doesn’t come naturally to him. He speaks quietly, his blue eyes focused on the task at hand. But there is purpose in his words.“I’m trying to be a leader more and more every week,” Sosinski says. “That’s not one of my strong suits, but I make sure I’m getting better at it because the whole team kind of looks at you. You’re calling the plays. You always have the ball in your hands so you got to make sure you’re a leader.”It has been a year of transition for Sosinski. Last year, he was the backup to Sam Sasso, learning as much as he could while not getting the reps with the first team in practice that are so valuable to a quarterback’s development.But when Sasso went down with an injury against Highland, Sosinski was ready to step up and Belles saw a diamond in the rough.

  • Photos: Seton Catholic vs Cortez football

    The game between Seton Catholic and Cortez HS at Seton Catholic High School in Chandler on Friday, Sept. 19, 2014. [Greg Herriman / Special to Tribune]

  • Photos: Mtn. Pointe vs Chandler football

    The football game between Mountain Pointe and Chandler at Mountain Pointe High School on Friday, Sept. 19, 2014.

  • Photos: Perry vs Mtn. View football

    The football game between Perry and Mountain View at Perry High School on Friday, Sept. 19, 2014. Mountain View won the game 16-14. (Arianna Grainey / Special To Tribune)

Tech Data Doctors Deals

  • Are you eligible for a new Medicare Advantage Plan?

    If you have Medicare coverage, you are probably familiar with a time of year known as the Annual Enrollment Period. This is a timeframe, typically from mid-October to early December, when people who are eligible for Medicare can enroll in, disenroll from or change their Medicare Advantage plan for the upcoming year.Once you select a Medicare Advantage Plan, you have a window from January to mid-February to disenroll and return to original Medicare. You can then purchase a separate Part D Prescription Drug Plan from a private company if you would like to do so.After the enrollment and disenrollment periods end, you are locked into original Medicare or the Medicare Advantage Plan you selected for the remainder of the year. However, there are some situations that may let you make a change to your existing coverage anytime of the year if you qualify.A Special Enrollment Period allows you to make changes to your Medicare coverage as a result of a specific circumstance. You may be eligible if you:• Are clinically diagnosed with certain chronic conditions.• Are just turning 65 or gaining your eligibility for Medicare.

  • Tribune lands several top honors at ANA contest

    The East Valley Tribune and its sister publication, the Ahwatukee Foothills News, were awarded a multitude of accolades at the Arizona Newspapers Association’s Excellence in Advertising competition on Sept. 19.In the General Excellence category, the East Valley Tribune was second and the AFN took third.The two publications swept the “Best Online Ad — Static” category with Christy Byerly and Elaine Cota taking the top spot for the AFN, and the duo of Byerly and Heather Straube received both second- and third-place honors for the Tribune.Holli Roach and Laura Meehan earned the top award for “Most Effective Use Of Small Space” for the AFN, and Byerly and Erik Maurer gave the Tribune a 1-2 finish in “Best Online Ad — Dynamic.”In “Best Newspaper Promotion Ad, Series or Section,” Roach finished second for the AFN while Byerly and Maurer took third for the Tribune.Byerly and Karen Mays finished second in “Best Color Ad” for the AFN, and third-place finishes were awarded to the Tribune’s Byerly, Tonya Mildenberg and Steve Insalaco in “Editorial Best Paid Ad Series — Color,” and to Byerly and Mildenberg in “Best Special Section.”

  • Gilbert plans new mixed-use building for fall 2015

    A new mixed-use building is planned to open in downtown Gilbert next fall.The 13,000-square-foot building will be located at 313 N. Gilbert Road in the town’s Heritage District. The building is planned to be three stories tall and will accommodate restaurants, retail stores, a rooftop bar and reception rooms for special events.The second floor of the building will also feature office space for TicketForce, a full-service ticketing company for businesses.Construction is set to begin January 2015.

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  • Are you eligible for a new Medicare Advantage Plan?

    If you have Medicare coverage, you are probably familiar with a time of year known as the Annual Enrollment Period. This is a timeframe, typically from mid-October to early December, when people who are eligible for Medicare can enroll in, disenroll from or change their Medicare Advantage plan for the upcoming year.Once you select a Medicare Advantage Plan, you have a window from January to mid-February to disenroll and return to original Medicare. You can then purchase a separate Part D Prescription Drug Plan from a private company if you would like to do so.After the enrollment and disenrollment periods end, you are locked into original Medicare or the Medicare Advantage Plan you selected for the remainder of the year. However, there are some situations that may let you make a change to your existing coverage anytime of the year if you qualify.A Special Enrollment Period allows you to make changes to your Medicare coverage as a result of a specific circumstance. You may be eligible if you:• Are clinically diagnosed with certain chronic conditions.• Are just turning 65 or gaining your eligibility for Medicare.

  • Engineering for Kids Summer Camp

    Engineering for Kids offering STEM Based Summer Camps at Primavera in Chandler. Announces Summer Camp Open House on May 17thWhat is East Valley Engineering for Kids?Engineering for Kids is an enrichment program that teaches concepts on a variety of engineering fields in classes and camps for kids’ ages 4-14. We want to spark an interest in the kids for science, technology and engineering. The camps are all themes based and require the kids to work in teams to address engineering challenges and problems. All programs meet national education standards for STEM and align with Common Core for math and science. Engineering for Kids has operated since 2009, is in 26 states and 4 countries. When and what is the open house for?The open house on May 17th is an opportunity for parents to come and see the facility, meet the staff from Engineering for Kids, and get their questions answered. The summer camps will be offered at Primavera Blended Learning Center at 2451 N. Arizona Avenue in Chandler. The open house is from 11 am to 3 pm.  From 1-2 pm we’re having our popular robotics workshop where the kids will build, program, test and improve the robots. At the end of the workshop, the kids will compete against each other in a Sumo Bot tournament. An RSVP is highly recommended as seating is limited. Please email your RSVP to eastvalley@engineeringforkids.net. What is Primavera Blended Learning Center?

  • Keeping the Faith: What is wrong with the world?

    “Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose,” goes the French proverb credited to Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr: “The more things change, the more they stay the same.” It’s not that a society or organization cannot be transformed. But such change is often cosmetic or superficial. Reality isn’t altered at the deeper, more profound levels.Simply examine today’s news feeds. There is conflict in the Middle East; fresh bloodshed in Iraq; a looming humanitarian catastrophe in Africa; upheaval with Russia; political unrest at home; is it 2014 or 1985 or 1978 or 1959 or 1913? Has nothing changed within these geopolitical situations? Of course, everything has changed.There have been new regimes, new faces, and new promises; the old guard has passed; generations have come and gone; the young and the restless have replaced the traditional and the settled. But the root issues and causes — things like greed, selfishness, sexism, patriarchy, racism, and tribalism, remain untouched.Leo Tolstoy said, “Everyone thinks of changing the world; but no one thinks of changing himself.” Everything we see in the larger world - the good, the bad, and the ugly - is a reflection of the individual, human heart. You can’t maintain a sane world when everyone in it is crazy. So we can’t begin with the world. We have to begin with our own hearts.One of the greatest British writers of the 20th century was G.K. Chesterton. He was great in size — a 300 pound, mountain of a man — and great with his words: Newspaper articles, short stories, essays, novels, theology, and poetry. But my favorite essay of his is a tiny one written to his local newspaper, The London Times.The editors solicited responses from the paper’s readership by asking this question: “What is wrong with the world?” Hundreds of long, verbose letters poured in. Then eminent authors and leading thinkers of the day were asked to respond to the question. The shortest and most powerful response to “What is wrong with the world?” came from Chesterton. He wrote: “Dear Sirs, I am.”

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