Letters to the editor: June 26 - East Valley Tribune: Opinion

Letters to the editor: June 26

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Posted: Thursday, June 25, 2009 2:43 pm | Updated: 1:29 am, Sat Oct 8, 2011.

We encourage readers to submit letters to the editor on issues of interest to East Valley residents. Submissions should be no longer than 300 words, factually accurate and original thoughts of the writer. Please be brief and include name, address, city and phone number for verification. Letters and comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Submit your letter to the editor

We encourage readers to submit letters to the editor on issues of interest to East Valley residents. Submissions should be no longer than 300 words, factually accurate and original thoughts of the writer. Please be brief and include name, address, city and phone number for verification. Letters and comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Submit your letter to the editor

PHOTO ENFORCEMENT

Don’t mask violations

In the public debate on photo enforcement, hiding civil violations caught on statewide photo-radar systems from driving records is one provision that needs to be addressed.

Auto insurers believe it goes against public safety and economic fairness. It allows frequent speeders on state roads to avoid the significant consequences of reckless driving that are applied to other drivers receiving violations in local jurisdictions in Arizona.

Those civil violations, which are the vast majority of state photo enforcemnet citations, will not be part of that individual’s driving record as auto insurers assess their insurance risk (criminal violations, 20 mph over posted speed limits, are reported and included on the violator’s driving record). One’s true driving record and behavior behind the wheel is an essential factor that insurers apply in determining what premiums to charge for auto-insurance coverage.

Mask these civil sanctions, and the person with multiple violations reduces the accuracy of driving records available for auto-insurance underwriting. As a result, high-risk drivers will pay less for coverage than they should, and low-risk drivers will pay more.

Neither public safety nor economic fairness is achieved by masking the ticket violations of people who should be held accountable for their dangerous and risky driving behavior.

RON WILLIAMS

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR,

ARIZONA INSURANCE COUNCIL

SCOTTSDALE

HEALTH CARE

The cost of doing nothing

I know what it is like to hear the three scariest words in the English language: “You have cancer.” When my doctor said those words to me 15 years ago I knew that my life had changed forever. What I didn’t know was that not only would I have to begin a fight for my life, but for my life savings as well.

Millions of people have struggled to get access to the treatment they need to fight this disease. More than 40 percent of people with cancer in this country say they have had trouble paying for health care costs, and many are delaying necessary treatments that they just can’t afford.

Recently, the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network released a poll that showed one in four people currently receiving cancer-related care has delayed treatment in the past year, and nearly one in three people under age 65 with cancer has been uninsured at some point since their diagnosis. These unacceptable figures demonstrate all too clearly the problems of our broken health care system.

If we can fix the health care system for cancer patients, we will fix it for virtually everyone else. We need to demand action now, not later, on comprehensive health care reform in this country. Patients with cancer or other chronic illnesses and their families can’t afford to wait.

RUSSELL G. GILLARD

MESA

MESA FEES

Pay for what you use

I was extremely disappointed with the June 5 article regarding the fee increases in Mesa. The writer refers to these programs as “once more affordable or, in some cases, entirely free.” Let’s get something straight here: There is no service provided by the government that is “entirely free,” not even just regular old free. We taxpayers are paying for these services, whether we use them or not. As a matter of fact, right now the employees working for Mesa are giving up 2 percent of every paycheck to help pay for these services. This 2 percent is money that was already earned by and allocated to the employees, but Mesa reneged on its obligation to pay its own employees because the city’s leadership doesn’t understand the concept of living within its means.

When I sit down to pay my bills each month, it is my obligation and my responsibility to pay my debts before I can go spend $100 entertaining my family at a local water park.

Why is it acceptable for Mesa to be providing entertainment, at taxpayers’ expense, when it is not paying its bills? Why are we paying for sports leagues and pools when our fire and police response times are getting longer every day?

Sure, it appears to be a great deal to be able to go to a city pool, which is more like an all-out water park these days, for $3.50 a person. But you are a fool if you think you are getting a good deal. If you do the math on what you actually pay in taxes, combined with the diminishing essential services (such as police, fire, and utilities), not to mention the increases you will be paying for all of your utilities, I can guarantee you would see that this service is nowhere near affordable, and certainly not free. Nothing is free.

HEATHER SCANTLEBURY

MESA

RELIGION

Celebrate our diversity

There was a plethora of reasons as to why I love America so very preciously, and one of those reasons is we are a people of who accept all forms of religion no matter form that it takes. That is why I don’t agree with the moniker of being called a “Christian nation,” because we are a nation of multi-religious faiths all in one. In America, we embrace Christianity, new age, Catholicism, Mormonism and an infusion of various other religions.

So we are not a one-nation faith but instead we’re a diverse religious nation whose diverse beliefs are the glue that makes America great. How I praise God that we live in a nation that welcomes such diversity among its religions. For in some nations, if you don’t strictly adhere to one specific religious faith, you may be imprisoned, murdered or both. Now, I challenge anyone out there to refute my view of diversified religious America via letters or e-mail to the Tribune. I await any responses.

WADE SCHLOSSER

CHANDLER

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