Letters to the editor: Dec. 2 - East Valley Tribune: Opinion

Letters to the editor: Dec. 2

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Posted: Tuesday, December 1, 2009 5:31 pm | Updated: 2:37 am, Sat Oct 8, 2011.

We encourage readers to submit letters to the editor on issues of interest to East Valley residents. Submissions should be no longer than 300 words, factually accurate and original thoughts of the writer. Please be brief and include name, address, city and phone number for verification. Letters and comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Submit your letter to the editor

We encourage readers to submit letters to the editor on issues of interest to East Valley residents. Submissions should be no longer than 300 words, factually accurate and original thoughts of the writer. Please be brief and include name, address, city and phone number for verification. Letters and comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Submit your letter to the editor

STATE BUDGET

Charter schools must share in cuts

Let me first say that unlike many I understand the difficulty in cutting programs, and I do not, like many, believe education should not be considered for cuts. However, the most recent bill is appalling for one glaring reason: Charter schools’ budgets were not cut. Whether the Legislature intended to or not, it sent the message that it wants to destroy public schools in favor of publicly funded charter schools where private citizens and even lawmakers could pocket tax dollars using the charter school rules that are in place. The Arizona system is already fraught with potential and apparent fraud and corruption. It allows for private corporations to enter into highly performing public school districts, steal students with a marketing scheme, and thereby tap into public tax dollars (worsening our budget) for profit, while undercutting the public school’s ability to perform.

Approval is given by the state, with school districts having no apparent opportunity to object or prove why it is not good for the impacted community. At the same time, AIMS testing is not required for charter schools (but individuals may still test to get even more state money), and teachers do not need to meet national No Child Left Behind requirements. Charter schools have their place, but the Arizona system abuses its principles to the extreme.

And now, the Legislature decided to take more money from the public schools while continuing to fund charter schools. Cuts, if necessary, should be for all in education, and businesses should be second to public education when it comes to funding with tax dollars. Make the tough decisions, but don’t play favorites.

TOM MCKINLEY

GILBERT

PATRIOTISM

Keeping hope in America

Whenever I am angered by Congress I put on my Uncle Sam costume and look for a busy intersection where I hold up a poster reading, “I didn’t vote for socialism!” That calms me down.

Cars beeping and drivers giving the thumbs-up sign outnumber obscenities yelled. Every beep, every thumbs-up of acceptance, inspires me more. It rekindles the weakened flame of liberty and breathes hope for our freedom. I love you, America.

FRANK TREJO

PHOENIX

HEALTH CARE REFORM

Government can’t control costs

When the thought is “our country is so great” and has done so much in the world, shouldn’t we have free health care? The answer is a big “no”! Why? It’s the cost. Why the cost? Because the health care system would be operated by our government, and we see what has happened with Social Security, Medicare, the post office and almost any other government department. The money goes in, and because it has no checks and balances to operate with a profit and earn money, it runs in the red. The system is designed so that it doesn’t show a problem with money until it is too late to fix. Why? Those who wrote the bill did not put financial controls where they should be, which keeps the system from finding out the costs of the project.

Why? Because they don’t have to account for the money. It isn’t theirs; it’s ours. And their goal is re-election and not cost savings.

Which health care system should we emulate? Which one better fits our total cost and total numbers? Do we have a comparison system? Are these systems more or less our type of plan for our type of people? Is there a span of coverage? Or is it one fits all? Will reform provide for those now not covered? Will there be state-to-state coverage? Are the insurance companies being asked to assist?

I don’t think government can operate the health care system alone.

KENDALL BENNETT

MESA

Don’t interfere with abortion decisions

The Stupak amendment to the House health care bill is an unacceptable political intrusion into the health care of every woman. What other legal medical procedures will they say “no” to? Only I will make those very personal decisions — not the electorate, not the politicians.

If conservatives really believe in the sanctity of life, will they also be sponsoring a repeal of the death penalty? Please, get your logic consistent, and stay away from my body.

J. CARLSON

PHOENIX

FEDERAL LANDS

Off-roaders spend more

The tree-huggers are playing the same old song — we know what’s best for the forest; let us make the rules. In a Nov. 18 guest column, Cyndi Tuell from the Center for Biological Diversity out of Tucson pushed for closing most of the back roads in Arizona. The column claims hikers and bird-watchers put significantly more dollars in our state’s economy than off-road enthusiasts. Nonmotorized recreationists drive to a trail, park and go hiking. Is that $50 pair of hiking boots going to save the state? Off-road enthusiasts (hunters, fishermen, campers, prospectors, ATV and dirt-bike riders) spend millions of dollars each year on vehicles, accessories, tags, licenses, off-road permits and gear such as hiking boots. Stopping motorized access to millions of acres of our land and the revenue generated by it would be one more liberty lost.

If we have individuals misusing our land, catch and punish them. That’s what we were told our off-road permit funds were to be used for. Let us not forget this is the same group that stopped forest thinning in the same half-a-million acres of forest that burned to the ground, then stopped the logging of the burnt trees. Perhaps we should ask the residents of Heber if these environmentalists would make good stewards of the forest, or better used car salesmen!

GARY LARSON

MESA 

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