Letters to the editor: Nov. 30 - East Valley Tribune: Opinion

Letters to the editor: Nov. 30

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Posted: Sunday, November 30, 2008 6:34 pm | Updated: 9:55 pm, Fri Oct 7, 2011.

We encourage readers to submit letters to the editor on issues of interest to East Valley residents. Submissions should be no longer than 300 words, factually accurate and original thoughts of the writer. Please be brief and include name, address, city and phone number for verification. Letters and call-in comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Submit your letter to the editor

We encourage readers to submit letters to the editor on issues of interest to East Valley residents. Submissions should be no longer than 300 words, factually accurate and original thoughts of the writer. Please be brief and include name, address, city and phone number for verification. Letters and call-in comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Submit your letter to the editor

PRESIDENT-ELECT OBAMA

Racism still prevalent

Now that the votes are counted and Barack Obama will be our next president, some say this spells the end of racism. That’s true only if you define racism as whites against blacks, as opposed to the broader and more accurate sense of the word.

Webster’s clearly defines racism as: “any program or practice of racial discrimination.” When 95 percent of blacks vote for a black person, that seems like racism. Ordinarily, we couldn’t get 95 percent of people to agree the sun rises in the east. Obama himself was the only candidate for the presidency who ever brought up race, thereby making race a central theme, at least for him. Many black people were interviewed before they voted and when exiting the polling places, and many of their answers showed they couldn’t name any of Obama’s policies or his running mate or who was in control of Congress. They just wanted a black man to win.

How would this have played out if John McCain had gotten 95 percent of the white vote, including those who were grossly uninformed about his policies and running mate?

There is much work to do on this issue. I saw blacks being interviewed during this past week and their sheer joy was a pleasure to see. That does not change the fact that when people of all colors vote based on the qualifications and policies of the candidate, regardless of skin color, then perhaps we will finally have put racism to bed.

LYNNE F. BREYER

SCOTTSDALE

Right info, right people

Regarding your editorial board’s opinion expressing fear that Barack Obama will become isolated in a tight cocoon (“Isolating president not best option,” Our View, Nov. 19), I would agree that some degree of isolation is expected and indeed important given the increased level of racist attacks seen recently nationwide. However, the isolation fear may be unfounded for one very important reason: the style difference between Barack Obama and the current president.

President George W. Bush made decisions based on a small number of closely trusted allies such as Dick Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld, and a few others. As a result, his decision-making ability was limited by the need to trust those few close allies. President-elect Obama, however, has shown from the beginning of his campaign that he is both able and willing to seek advisement from a wide variety of experts. Obama is broadly expected to build a strong team, to begin getting the right things done quickly, and to have considerable impact even before he takes office.

This is because he has shown that he has the intensity and curiosity to get the right information from the right people, and the decisiveness to use that information to make the right decisions. This is the kind of leader that America needed to elect. It is time to stop generating fear and put our full support behind our new president-elect.

STEVEN EASTMAN

TEMPE

HILLARY CLINTON

Trust Obama’s decision

It is time to give Hillary Clinton a break, time to set aside recriminations and second-guessing her intent. Americans put their trust in Barack Obama to lead the nation, because they saw in him a genuine alliance of brain power, altruism and charisma with the ability to take the country forward.

We have made our choice quite clear and should now help Obama fulfill that dream. The president-elect reminds me of another promising leader who worked to elevate the poor and bridge the country’s divisions. One would imagine Robert F. Kennedy’s words resonating deep in Obama’s soul: “There are those who look at things the way they are, and ask why … I dream of things that never were, and ask why not?”

The world never dreamed of an America ready to elect its first young, courageous, black president. And “why not?” If we had the courage and willpower to do so, if we decided he has political acumen and has already shown a bipartisan openness in his cabinet choices, why not trust his judgment?

It’s time to recognize Clinton’s formidable intelligence, tenacity and loyalty. It’s time to look forward to a solid partnership, not a passé rivalry.

COLETTE JENKINS

ANTHEM

Too self-absorbed for State

Hillary Clinton as secretary of state is a bad choice for President-elect Barack Obama. He doesn’t owe her or the Clintons anything. New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson would be a great choice. He would focus on helping Obama solve international issues with diplomacy. Clinton would use the job as a soapbox to promote what is most dear to her — me, me, me. And with her burger-gobbling husband in the shadows, it would be like having the wolf watching the hen house.

Other countries would look at the United States and ask Obama if he needs to check with Hillary Clinton first and laugh. Please pray that she spends the next four years doing what she does best, cracking that phony smile and touring the country talking about herself.

TERENCE J. STULIR

MESA

HOMELAND SECURITY

Chance to close border

Gov. Janet Napolitano has repeatedly complained that our border security problem is the responsibility of the federal government, and in particular the Department of Homeland Security, to fund and operate. As secretary of Homeland Security, she should have no problem getting the border secured next year.

After all, her party runs the whole show in Washington, D.C. If she does not have the border secure before 2010, we’ll know how much she really cares about Arizona and national security and should not be our senator.

BILL SANDRY

MESA

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