Letters to the editor: April 29 - East Valley Tribune: Opinion

Letters to the editor: April 29

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Posted: Tuesday, April 29, 2008 1:17 am | Updated: 8:50 pm, Fri Oct 7, 2011.

We encourage readers to submit letters to the editor on issues of interest to East Valley residents. Submissions should be no longer than 300 words, factually accurate and original thoughts of the writer. Please be brief and include name, address, city and phone number for verification. Letters and call-in comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Submit your letter to the editor

We encourage readers to submit letters to the editor on issues of interest to East Valley residents. Submissions should be no longer than 300 words, factually accurate and original thoughts of the writer. Please be brief and include name, address, city and phone number for verification. Letters and call-in comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Submit your letter to the editor

TRANSPORTATION

Don’t rush into ballot plan

The TIME coalition, proponents of a $42 billion transportation plan, should take the time to review their project list and financing options before they start requesting signatures for their initiative.

It makes little sense to ask voters to approve light rail expansion before light rail is even operating. Voters may also wonder why commuter rail must be operated by government, especially when private rail lines exist in the corridors under consideration. The coalition’s own survey showed voter preference for user fees to fund transportation projects. A sales tax is a poor choice for funding, yet is favored by the TIME coalition.

Impact fees, light rail corridor property taxes, higher mass transit fares, tolls on roads, higher gas taxes, and a mileage-based motor vehicle registration fee should be considered. As an added benefit, increased user fees will encourage people to limit their transportation usage — something sales tax funding does not do.

If the TIME coalition insists on a sales tax, they should use their initiative to eliminate current giveaways of sales tax dollars. Cities and towns across Arizona give away a large portion of the motor vehicle sales taxes they collect as rebates to auto dealers. By prohibiting local governments from levying a sales tax on motor vehicles and initiating a regional transportation infrastructure tax (not subject to rebates) on motor vehicle sales, more money would be available for transportation projects without costing Arizona taxpayers a penny more.

THOMAS C. SCHUELKE

MESA

No way to sales tax hike

This proposed 1 cent sales tax to pay for road construction and mass transit is another farce. How about publishing the names of the businesses that are pushing for it. I bet they all stand to make tons of money building and supplying the materials for it. As for the governor, how about cutting spending like the rest of us, instead of supporting any and all tax increases that come down the pike. It ain’t your money, it’s the taxpayers.

RON LIDDELL

MESA

MESA BUDGET

Finter editorial misleading

Your opinion of City Councilman-elect Alex Finter (Our View, April 15) is misleading. The current City Council has had plenty of opportunities to correct what they have been bellyaching about for years. The fact is they don’t have the intestinal fortitude to fix it.

Finter is merely calling them out to fix the problem or stop complaining about it. If the economic disaster they claim is around the corner or the sky will fall – then do something about it.

The current council, sans Tom Rawles, wants a champagne city on a beer budget and they grouse about it every meeting. If they want more services, more unneeded government spending and spending tax money on things government shouldn’t be spending money on, then they should impose a property tax and bear the consequences. If Mesa got out of the economic development business, out of the arts business, out of the downtown development business and out of the museum business, they’d have the money to fund fire and police services.

BOB HISSERICH

MESA

REV. JEREMIAH WRIGHT

Blessing America

It seems that no one has questioned the Rev. Jeremiah Wright’s faith. If he were truly a disciple of Christ his message would have been: God bless America, because my ancestors were sold into slavery to America where they were eventually allowed to become free.

God bless America, that this free country realized it was wrong to enslave any person and fought a vicious civil war to change it.

God bless America, for changing the life of all minorities forever by desegregating the schools, giving them preference into the universities and desegregating the military.

God bless America, a country that realized keeping blacks from professional sports because of their color, now picks them for their athletic ability, allowing them to make hundreds of millions of dollars.

God bless America, for voting blacks into positions of power in all phases of our government.

God bless America, for having a black man running for president of the United States.

God bless America, that has moved from slavery towards real equality in a little more than 150 years.

Do we have a long way to go? Certainly, but we are doing it! Wright needs to follow the teachings of Martin Luther King and teach hope, not hate.

W. KERR

MESA

MUSEUM OF THE WEST

Another boon for tourism

In the hotel business, we continually provide new features and amenities to keep up with tourists’ expectations. We renovate to meet the desires of our visitors and keep our property attractive. Whether in Scottsdale or any other destination, you have to evolve and offer something new to stay competitive.

The Scottsdale Museum of the West is a project that not only supports our tourism industry, but also adds to the lifestyle we as residents enjoy.

The museum’s future location is a great complement to our arts community, as it will sit among our galleries and retail stores, and only a few blocks from the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art. Balancing our history with the new personality of Scottsdale, the museum’s exhibits will showcase our roots while the architecture illustrates that we are a thriving, modern city. The museum also will provide a new space for public gatherings and events, and serve as an enormous educational tool for our children.

No matter whether you feel a connection to our Western history, like the modern architecture of the building, or even enjoy museums, I hope you will take a look at this project. The Scottsdale Museum of the West has the potential to bring to life our city’s culture and provide another reason for visitors to choose Scottsdale.

BILL NASSIKAS

PRESIDENT & COO, WESTROC HOTELS & RESORTS

SCOTTSDALE

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