Letters to the editor: Feb. 21 - East Valley Tribune: Opinion

Letters to the editor: Feb. 21

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Posted: Sunday, February 21, 2010 3:53 pm | Updated: 3:45 am, Sat Oct 8, 2011.

We encourage readers to submit letters to the editor on issues of interest to East Valley residents. Submissions should be no longer than 300 words, factually accurate and original thoughts of the writer. Please be brief and include name, address, city and phone number for verification. Letters and comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Submit your letter to the editor

We encourage readers to submit letters to the editor on issues of interest to East Valley residents. Submissions should be no longer than 300 words, factually accurate and original thoughts of the writer. Please be brief and include name, address, city and phone number for verification. Letters and comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Submit your letter to the editor

GUN LEGISLATION

Reject gun control

A “retired police officer” commented in the Vent about the need for stronger gun control because people “slobber” while handling guns at Bass Pro Shop.

He should read his “oath of office,” in which he swore to uphold the Constitution. I, too, am a law enforcement officer and believe in the Second Ammendment and the God-given right of the preservation of life. Why does law enforcement feel they have the right to prohibit citizens from carrying guns?

Look at the U.K. and Australia after their arms were seized by the government. Crime rates are out of control! I also know that gun control only restricts law-abiding citizens. Bad guys don’t obey the law! I support the current gun legislation allowing all law-abiding citizens to carry concealed weapons. Don’t restrict the good guys.

As an American law-abiding citizen first and a law enforcement officer second, I will not rely solely on the police to protect me or my family from those who would do us harm. I will not be a victim nor allow my family to be victimized because a retired gun-grabbing police officer thinks I should wait for him to come to my rescue.

SEAN PEARCE

MESA

ABORTION

Arguments in favor don’t hold up

The letter by Taylor Jablonowski (Tribune, Jan. 27) got me thinking. It said, “abortion will always happen, legal or not.” The letter says safe places should be provided for the “procedure” so women are not forced into back alleys to have them done.

I say that murder, abuse and theft will always happen. Should we legalize them? Should we set up comfortable clean rooms for those “procedures” to be carried out?

I know abortion is legal. That will never make it moral. Medical professionals trained to save lives should not have to participate in the destruction of them.

When my daughter was 1 year old, I showed her an ultrasound and asked her what it was. She said it was “a baby.” She knew it was not a picture of me. I’m not a baby. It was a picture of another distinct individual. It was my son.

People say that a woman should be able to make choices about her own body. That sounds reasonable. But it is not just her body affected by abortion.

I want each woman to know of her infinite value and see solutions beyond killing — solutions that are deserving of every kind of help and comfort. We could keep women out of dark alleys by choosing actions worthy of light.

ROBIN FINLINSON

CHANDLER

EDUCATION FUNDING

Government doing what it can

I am a senior at Highland High School and recently read a letter to the editor I disagreed with about the need to restore education funds.

Yes, children are the future. They are the future doctors, lawyers, CEOs, etc. But with the same education and funding that was given many years ago, the country has successful doctors and lawyers. The government may have cut back on a few budgets for schools and that is unfortunate, but money isn’t the only way to get children to learn and grow up to be successful. It’s how hard they work and how interested they are in school.

The letter said education is being pushed aside by state legislators. Education is not being pushed aside because if it were then there wouldn’t be all the books that stock the library shelves, the computers that fill up the multiple computer labs in the schools and even the new textbooks that have been coming in.

Another statement that stood out was “all forms of government in America are designated to be 'by the people, for the people.’” That may be true, but different people have different views on situations. So what one group of people vote on is not going to necessarily sit well with another. “By the people, for the people” doesn’t translate to “everyone is going to like this decision.”

The government is doing what it can for education, with help from teachers, parents and the children themselves.

EMMA R. DOTY

GILBERT

BARACK OBAMA

GOP failing God’s test

I went to Catholic school. I believed in miracles. I believed that God tested people. If you are a believer, is it possible to believe that God’s hand is guiding President Barack Obama? Maybe Republicans are denying God’s plan for Obama to bring our country together.

Isn’t it ironic that a biracial president is in the position to help us heal. Isn’t that a miracle?

I am shocked by the rampant obstructionism I am witnessing. I believe the Republicans are failing the test.

CAROL GUIRGUIS

MESA

CONGRESSIONAL PAY

Lawmakers should not raise salaries

With unemployment still hovering around 10 percent, foreclosures up 21 percent, and so many families struggling to make ends meet, we believe this is the wrong time for members of Congress to raise their own pay.

Unfortunately, unless Congress takes action to stop it, that is precisely what will happen.

This Congress, we have once again introduced legislation, HR4255, to prevent members of Congress from receiving the next scheduled pay raise, and have once again been joined by more than 100 colleagues. Last year, our efforts helped to successfully block the fiscal 2010 pay raise. We believe that blocking the pay raise again this year is equally important.

In times like these, Congress should be focused on helping our economy and helping those who are suffering because of it, not raising our own pay. The American people are not getting a raise this year. Neither should Congress.

Last year President Barack Obama froze pay for senior White House employees. Even U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts recently announced that, in a major break from tradition and in light of the fact that “so many of our fellow citizens have been touched by hardship,” he will not seek salary increases this year for federal judges.

Congress should follow suit.

In addition to facing an economy that has left so many Americans out of work and underemployed, Congress must tackle a rising national debt and continual budget deficits.

Last year, we saved taxpayers $2.5 million by blocking the pay raise for members of Congress. While this raise is dwarfed by the $12 trillion debt, it represents the type of bipartisan fiscal responsibility we believe Congress needs to adopt. That is why our bill has been endorsed by Citizens Against Government Waste and the National Taxpayers Union.

Enacting HR4255, the Stop the Automatic Pay Raise for Members of Congress in FY2011 Act, is an important, albeit obvious, step for Congress to take in the fiscal 2011 budget.

REPS. HARRY MITCHELL (D-ARIZ.) AND RON PAUL (R-TEXAS)

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