Letters to the editor: April 8 - East Valley Tribune: Opinion

Letters to the editor: April 8

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Posted: Monday, April 7, 2008 11:44 pm | Updated: 8:39 pm, Fri Oct 7, 2011.

We encourage readers to submit letters to the editor on issues of interest to East Valley residents. Submissions should be no longer than 300 words, factually accurate and original thoughts of the writer. Please be brief and include name, address, city and phone number for verification. Letters and call-in comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Submit your letter to the editor

We encourage readers to submit letters to the editor on issues of interest to East Valley residents. Submissions should be no longer than 300 words, factually accurate and original thoughts of the writer. Please be brief and include name, address, city and phone number for verification. Letters and call-in comments may be edited for clarity and length.

Submit your letter to the editor

HOMESCHOOLING

Not too much shelter

It is important to consider the lifelong effects homeschooling will have on the children, especially negatively. As a child who grew up in a similar situation, this is the true story of what will happen if the proper precautions are not taken.

I was very much a child of the ‘50s. I attended a religious private school and was constantly under pressure from my strict parents, who believed being “sheltered” from the world was the only way to live a pure and healthy life. I was repressed in everything that I did as I grew up in this environment. I was never exposed to any of the harsh realities that most modern children can see by just turning on a television set.

The day finally came that I had to leave my hometown. I had to leave this blanket of comfort that, unbeknownst to me, was smothering all of my social development. I was married very young, still a child in mind and body, and I was thrown into the hard, tough world that could I cope with alone. I became tormented as to what was right in the world.

Take a good hard look at the long-term effects and consider the ramifications. Will such children be able to handle conflicts in an adult relationship if they never handled them in child play when they leave their sheltered environment?

DORIS ANNE BEAULIEU

SMITHFIELD, MAINE

PRESIDENTIAL RACE

He was there

According to the League of Conservation Voters, Sen. John McCain tallied one of the worst environmental voting records in the 2007 Senate. He abstained from voting on all of LCV’s 15 litmus test votes (e.g. auto mileage standards).

Some reporters mistakenly concluded McCain’s 15 abstentions were because he was out campaigning. Not so! McCain missed 57 percent of his 2007 Senate votes, Sen. Barack Obama 40 percent and Sen. Hillary Clinton 27 percent. Nonetheless, Obama and Clinton voted in 11 of those 15 critical votes.

McCain’s environmental record in Arizona is equally troubling. He supports a telescope project on Mt. Graham which destroys old-growth habitat for one of America’s most endangered mammals, the Mt. Graham red squirrel, and offends American Indian reverence for that sacred mountain.

McCain recently sponsored land exchange legislation giving a foreign mining company 3,000 acres of environmentally and culturally unique U.S. Forest Service land. The mine imperils an endangered cactus species, several unique birds, and multiple Native American religious and historical sites. McCain’s legislation slams the door on public scrutiny and exempts the mine from the National Environmental Policy Act.

LAURIE NESSEL

TEMPE

MORALITY

Culture devolution

Children are being led by precept and example; but of the wrong kind. Unless young people and their parents are told the truth about the culture revolution, America’s status of respect in the world will continue to decline.

By combining misinterpretation, rationalization and media pressure, far-left organizations were able to circumvent the Constitution and turn our culture upside down. Court rulings opened the door for anti-morality propaganda, illicit sex and criminal behavior of all kinds to prevail; while the virtuous principles upon which our nation was founded were limited through legislation.

Many people who grew up during the revolution, including many leaders in business and government, believe there are no absolutes; that everything can be rationalized to satisfy their “feel-good” fantasies and ambitions.

It is this writer’s hope that young people will study the noiseless progression of the ACLU since its creation in 1920 and then do what they can to serve the United States politically.

ROBERT BLAZIER

MESA

MESA ELECTION

How we got here

In May, we vote for a new mayor. I hope our new leader is chosen wisely. When I hired on with Mesa in 1978 we were awarded the title, “One of the Top 40 All American Cities in the US.” Now we struggle to stay alive and are on the verge of bankruptcy. Contrary to those who like to think they’re in the know, it’s not from gross mismanagement of plentiful funds.

As a people, we have too many old-way and complacent thinkers. We have fought too much change and have voted out too many things that could have boosted our economy. For the ideas that do get voted in, we make their planners jump through too many hoops and with current businesses, we’re not business-friendly enough. With the voting away of great ideas that have usually ended up in a neighboring community, pouring money into their economy, we have less and less tax base, money that is used for the investing in the community.

As our city fails to keep up with other cities, affluent people and businesses start relocating. Unless reversed, the cycle continues until what is left is no longer desirable.

Choosing a leader who can help balance the books will be simple. Other than math skills, it takes little talent to do that. However, trying to cut and slash our way to prosperity will only lead us deeper into impoverishment for no amount of cuts will save us. Besides honor and integrity and the willingness to serve the needs of the greater over the wants of the few, the quality we need most in our leaders is the ability to have vision. People who can see what could be. We need citizens who are entrepreneurs and leaders who are dreamers and promoters and builders. If that is not who is chosen in May, if that is not what we ask of our current leaders, the city we all love will continue to slide downhill.

SAMUEL JEPPSEN

QUEEN CREEK

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