911 dispatcher helps with childbirth when mom doesn't reach hospital - East Valley Tribune: Health

911 dispatcher helps with childbirth when mom doesn't reach hospital

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Posted: Sunday, August 25, 2013 1:08 am

A woman on the way to the hospital didn’t quite make it in time and delivered her baby with the help of her family and a 911 dispatcher.

Phoenix fire Capt. Tony Muir said Patricia Galvan was on her way to Phoenix Indian Medical Center last Friday to deliver her 7th child.

But the baby apparently couldn’t wait and around 5:45 p.m. as she and several family members were driving down Washington Street in Tempe they had to pull over and call 911.

“I thought, ‘I can’t do this, I haven’t made it to the hospital,’” recalled Galvan.

Galvan’s husband David and mother-in-law quickly pulled off the freeway and into Salt River Project’s visitor's parking lot off Washington Street and Center Parkway.

“I remember saying that I've got to push and David telling me, 'No, not now just wait, just hold it, don't push,' and I told him ‘I have to, I've got to push,’” Galvan told ABC15.

Galvan’s sister-in-law called 911.

Phoenix Fire Department dispatcher Taylor Bielmann took the call.

“I knew there would be a day this call would come,” said Bielmann, who is fairly new to the dispatch team. She trained for months before starting her job a year ago.

Bielmann kept Galvan’s sister-in-law calm as she walked her and Galvan’s husband through the birthing process.

“I remember seeing his head when I was lying down and then the next thing I remember he's already in his dad's arms,” said Galvan.

On the 911 call Galvan’s sister-in-law can be heard telling Bielmann the head is out and then the whole body is out.

“I asked if the baby was breathing at first and they said 'no,'” recalled Bielmann.

Over the phone Bielmann told the family to wipe any blood and mucus from the baby’s mouth.

That’s when you can hear tension drain from Galvan’s sister-in-law as she exclaimed, “Okay he’s crying!”

“When the baby was fine and I knew the mom and baby were doing fine -- that was the moment,” Bielmann said, explaining the relief she felt.

When paramedics arrived, they let the baby’s older sister Alicia Galvan cut the umbilical cord.

Alicia had unexpectedly watched the entire birth and told abc15, “I didn’t know the body worked that way.”

David and Patricia named their newborn son, David Galvan III.

Baby David and his mother are doing great and hope to one day thank 911 dispatcher Taylor Bielmann for her help.

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