The Black Stallion Show brings classic tale to life - East Valley Tribune: Get Out

The Black Stallion Show brings classic tale to life

Print
Font Size:
Default font size
Larger font size

Posted: Saturday, May 1, 2010 3:32 pm | Updated: 3:22 am, Sat Oct 8, 2011.

 Scenes from the beloved story will come to life Sunday at The Black Stallion Show in Scottsdale. It’s a traveling production put on by performers and horses from Arabian Nights. The show is also a fundraiser for The Black Stallion Literacy Foundation, a nonprofit started in 1999 to get first- through fifth-graders hooked on reading through interaction with live horses and Walter Farley’s books.

You may remember this story.

A boy and a wild stallion are shipwrecked on a deserted island, where they slowly forge a bond. Eventually rescued, the pair go on to ride to victory in a high-stakes match race.

It’s the plotline of the 1941 book “The Black Stallion,” a Walter Farley classic still read by kids the world over and adapted into a 1979 movie nominated for two Oscars.

Scenes from the beloved story will come to life Sunday at The Black Stallion Show in Scottsdale. It’s a traveling production put on by performers and horses from Arabian Nights, a Florida equine theater that ranks with major Orlando attractions Universal Studios and Sea World Adventure Park.

The show is also a fundraiser for The Black Stallion Literacy Foundation, a nonprofit started in 1999 to get first- through fifth-graders hooked on reading through interaction with live horses and Farley’s books.

Conceived by the author’s son, Tim Farley, and Mark Miller, a lifelong horseman and owner of Arabian Nights, the program has served 400,000 youngsters in school- and community-based reading programs. In Arizona, more than a dozen Chandler, Gilbert and Mesa elementary schools participate, says Patti Lopez, the group’s southwest regional director. The program also serves schools across the Valley and state.

During the show, horses and costumed actors create a new story, building drama for the eventual appearance of its main star, The Black himself, an ebony steed who performs a riderless routine.

“The children often chant for The Black and scream wildly to see him; it’s very moving,” says Audrey Padgett, Arabian Nights’ executive vice president.

Proceeds from the show go to The Black Stallion Literacy Foundation, which brings learning materials and educational experiences to local schools and community groups for little or no cost.

Contact writer: (480) 898-6818 or azajac@evtrib.com

  • Discuss

Facebook

GetOut on Facebook

Twitter

GetOut on Twitter

Google+

GetOut on Google+

RSS

Subscribe to GetOut via RSS

RSS Feeds

Spacer4px
Your Az Jobs